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Newly Named Diseases and Conditions

New Names Suggest the Possibiity of a New Diagnosis

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Updated January 24, 2013

Names are given to newly-defined diseases, conditions, syndromes and disorders on a regular basis, using a variety of approaches, including these and others:

They may be named after the doctor or scientist who defines them, or who writes the diagnostic guidelines, like Alzheimers , Parkinsons or Cushings.

They may be named using the symptoms they represent, like Multiple Sclerosis or Muscular Dystrophy.

They may be named for the part of the body they affect, like coronary artery disease

Or the geographic region they are identified with, like Lyme Disease, or for their affect on the body, like Sickle Cell Disease.

Sometimes they are named simply because a drug company can make money from an old drug if they can suggest it as a treatment for a new, made up disease. (Learn more about this "disease mongering" and find a list of the made up names.)

A "new" diagnosis can both help, and create problems for patients. It would seem that finally naming a diagnosis would create treatment opportunities - a real plus. But there are a number of reasons a new name for a diagnosis won't be of much help at all.

Here is a list of newly named diagnoses for diseases and conditions, plus links for more information where available.

If you are familiar with a new diagnosis (named in the past 20-30 years) that is not listed here, please add it to this list.

AutoImmune Diseases

Genetic Disease

Infectious Diseases

Cancers

Mental Health Diagnoses

Miscellaneous Diseases and Conditions

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If you are familiar with a new diagnosis (named in the past 20-30 years) that is not listed here, please add it to this list.

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